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Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 10:52 am
by Tony Kroos
However, the really big "gotcha" with AES is that it has a detectable signature or footprint if you will

Proof link?

Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 11:37 am
by Enigman
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Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 11:48 am
by stu
Enigman wrote:
Tony Kroos wrote:
However, the really big "gotcha" with AES is that it has a detectable signature or footprint if you will

Proof link?

Read the NSA website for the Utah data center. The site is called "The Domestic Surveillance Directorate" https://nsa.gov1.info/index.html

The above site details on several pages everything they can scan for and collect.


"This parody website has no connection whatsoever to the National Security Agency."

https://nsa.gov1.info/about/about.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill ... formative/

Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 12:35 pm
by Tony Kroos
Can't find any related info there.
AES-encoded data has no detectable signatures.

Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 12:54 pm
by Enigman
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Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 1:10 pm
by Enigman
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Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 2:03 pm
by mishem
I could reasonably expect a visit or communication from the NSA insisting on disclosure of the details.

They'll offer the job. ;)
:lol:

Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 2:34 pm
by Enigman
LOL :lol: ... I could use the money. Retirement isn't all it's cracked up to be.

Additional post content removed by author.

Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 3:47 pm
by Tony Kroos
When captured and examined the attachments turn out NOT to be any known binary format such as a program, image, video, document or database. That alone is a footprint and up goes the flag.

It's too lame... anyone may include anything in original or encrypted data, including fake image or video headers/signatures. So what about zip/rar archives, it should raise the flag too? And they inspect every archive sent over net? Even password protected? It looks nearly impossible to me.

Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 6:16 pm
by Enigman
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Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 6:39 pm
by Enigman
Neosoft Support wrote:Hans-Peter's plug-in with the Mime encode/decode actions can be found here:

http://www.neosoftware.com/neobook/modules/plugins/singlefile.php?cid=6&lid=11

Cool breeze. I have been wanting to read my e-mail data files from Thunderbird and Pocomail and embed them into my inventory management system's Access database to make them filterable for future reference. This saves me from writing the decoder.

Nifty. 8)

Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 9:42 pm
by Tony Kroos
What I am saying is that if the NSA is interested in finding people that are sending AES or ANY OTHER known or unknown encryption or file type across e-mail, they can do it. If they want to find RAR files, ZIP files or any other files, they CAN do it. Password protected or not doesn't matter because they are not READING the file as in a human reading a book. File TYPES can be identified by their binary structure. ALL binary and text files have a binary structure that is defined. If you know where the binary markers and boundaries are located, you can identify what the file is or what software wrote it. You don't need to physically put eyes on the file to do it. That's just computing 101. Welcome to data storage.

If I'm frequently sending or receiving emails with archives attached, I'm tracked and NSA watching me. Okay... 8)
Btw, what's the point of tracking if you cannot read or decrypt data? Amount of email traffic with binary (zip/rar) data is too high to make any decisions, unless all such traffic considered "suspicious" (which is lame).
Generally speaking, The mere presence of an AES attachment does NOT raise a flag as we speak. HOWEVER, if you were to send encrypted data consistently back and forth with lets say, someone in Afganistan, and If you did it long enough, and only the NSA knows what today's definition of "long enough" is, then YES it can raise a flag. That flag on you would then be passed to real live bodies for further analysis of your traffic. THAT is how the NSA looks for national security threats, among many other ways, both human and machine based.

Too lame for terrorists write emails from usa directly to afganistan or exchange any data ) unless they are idiots (obviously, they are not). Why don't they just use free EU mail services and proxy? )

I know that NSA is tracking and filtering plain text data, it's easy and directly readable. But do not tell that it is possible to make any serious decisions based on binary data, except the fact that it exists.

Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 9:46 pm
by Tony Kroos
Oh wait a minute, waaait a minuute... Did I say "terrorists" ? :shock: We all tracked now 8)
with lets say, someone in Afganistan,

8) 8)

Re: Binary conversion

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 10:33 pm
by Enigman
Hi Tony,

I have described the situation in excruciating detail complete with reasons and all technical concepts. I have also quoted from personal experience doing the same thing for a different branch of the "community". We could extrapolate that it is neither "lame" nor "impossible". I'm sorry if this subject is hard to wrap one's head around, so to speak. Do your own research on the subject. The information can be found on internet, in books, in the news, in journals or from people who have been in or near the "community". 8)

Thanks.